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    Category: Job Seekers

    Failed The Phone Interview

    | Chicago, IL, USA | Extra Stupid, Job Seekers, Lazy/Unhelpful

    (Each department in the hotel where I work offers a temporary management training position that, once you complete it, lets you transfer to a management position in any hotel in the chain with openings. One of my coworkers, who is known for being very childlike and constantly using his cell phone — which is not allowed — applied for the position.)

    Coworker: “I didn’t get the management job.”

    Me: *inaudibly* “I didn’t think you would.”

    Coworker: “They should have given it to me! They gave it to somebody who doesn’t even work here! I already know this job! I told the general manager of the hotel in my interview that I could do my whole job while having a conversation on my phone at the same time!”

    Me: “Wait a minute. You told the general manager that you’re on your phone while you’re supposed to be working?”

    Coworker: *nodding enthusiastically and grinning* “Yeah!”

    Me: “And you don’t know why you didn’t get the job?!”

    Cereal Killing The Mood

    | USA | Bizarre/Silly, Job Seekers

    (I’m at a job interview for a dog boarding facility. My previous job has a very laid-back environment, but I want to show that I am serious about the position. They have asked me the basic questions, which I have managed to answer professionally. After a while, they start asking some weird questions.)

    Interviewer: “So if you were a type of cereal, what would you be?”

    Me: “Frosted Flakes…? Because they’re grrrrreat!”

    Interviewer: *completely expressionless*

    Me: “I… That was a joke….”

    (Surprisingly, after that idiotic joke, I got a call from them a week later with an offer. I ended up declining for a better offer.)

    Preliminary Discriminatory Interview

    , | LA, USA | Bad Behavior, Bosses & Owners, Job Seekers, Religion

    (I am 20 and have just moved cities. I am interviewing for a job at a fast food restaurant, trying to find anything I can just to get started and pay bills. My resume lists my school experience and work experience. I homeschooled K-12 and am attending online college. However, I have worked since I was 16, at a bookstore (for a little over three years), a restaurant (a few months until finding a full-time job), and an office. My duties and experiences at each job are listed on my resume, and they include a vast number of things. The bookstore was a Christian company and had the word ‘Christian’ in its name; the office job was the same. Additionally, one of my other experiences listed on my resume was Vacation Bible School ‘counselor.’)

    Manager: *looks over resume and application* “Hmm. I see here that you’ve primarily worked with Christian companies… Will you be able to handle working with others who don’t share your beliefs? Some of my other employees might say things that you won’t be comfortable with.”

    (Before I can correct him that, one: how does he know what I am or am not comfortable with, and two: that I’d worked with people who didn’t share my beliefs and that never caused a problem, he continues:)

    Manager: “Also, I see you’ve homeschooled your whole life. Are you going to be okay when there are a lot of people in the shop? We get really busy on holidays and you’ll have to interact with a lot of customers.”

    (I bite back the urge to tell him in no uncertain terms that I lasted over three years in a bookstore where part of my job was to work the sales floor during Black Friday and help customers, as well as plan and run kids’ events, but apparently my fear of people is what gave me such excellent references to recommend me. Instead, I politely told him I’d be fine. He ended the interview by saying he thought I’d do well and would call me in the next few days after doing some other interviews.)

    Manager: “And if I don’t call you by Friday, I want you to call and ask for me, okay? I work Mondays through Fridays here.”

    (When I don’t hear back by that Friday, I call the next Monday.)

    Employee: “Oh [Manager] isn’t in right now. Call this afternoon.”

    (I do.)

    Employee: “Oh, [Manager] isn’t in right now. Call tomorrow. He’ll be here then.”

    (The next day…)

    Employee: “Oh, [Manager] isn’t in right now. Call tomorrow. He’ll be here then.”

    (Finally, I gave up on the job. Thankfully I found another one soon after; where the interviewer didn’t insult me with discriminatory questions!)

    Ended Up Being A Bad Experience

    | Ft. Worth, TX, USA | Bad Behavior, Job Seekers

    (After a month of searching I finally snag an interview. It is a 40 minute drive to their offices, but hey, it is a potential job. I wait another 30 minutes before the interview, which lasts 10. It seemed to have gone well…)

    Me: “Thank you again for the interview. I really appreciate it. When should I expect a follow-up call?”

    Interviewer: “There won’t be one.”

    Me: “Oh. Did… I say something wrong? I thought we had a good rapport. I mean, even if we didn’t, I figured there would be a follow-up call to let me know that I wouldn’t fit the job position.”

    Interviewer: “No. No. You did just fine. But we filled the job two days ago.”

    Me: “Oh… then why did you interview me? Is there another position available?”

    Interviewer: “No, there isn’t. We felt that since you put in the time to apply that we should interview you.”

    Me: “Even when there isn’t a job available?”

    Interviewer: “It’s good experience to have interviews!”

    Me: “I’m sorry, but just so I’m clear about all of this: I spent 40 minutes driving here, 30 minutes waiting in the lobby, roughly 10 minutes for the interview, and I anticipate another 40 minutes for a drive back home. Altogether I’ve had two hours of my time, that I could have spent applying for more jobs, and 80 miles worth of gas, wasted for a position that isn’t available?”

    Interviewer: “But interviewing is a good experience and will help you with future job hunts.”

    Me: “Yeah. Could you at least honor one request of mine and destroy my resume? I don’t want it in your files.”

    (As I leave the room, there are three more people sitting in the lobby, obviously dressed up for interviews.)

    Me: “Are you all here to interview for [Job] position?”

    (They all nod or mumble yes.)

    Me: “Don’t bother. They filled it two days ago and didn’t notify us.”

    (When the interviewer acknowledged this, everyone seated got up to leave, one gentleman ranting about the hour long drive it took for him to get there. All the while the interviewer was shouting behind us ‘It’s a good experience!’)

    Not Dressed To Impress

    | Auckland, New Zealand | Job Seekers, Lazy/Unhelpful, Theme Of The Month

    (As part of receiving my state-run unemployment insurance I have to attend seminars on finding work. On one occasion, I’m in one where the topic of interview dress is mentioned.)

    Lecturer: “So, it really doesn’t matter about your experience, or whatever, just so long as you dress up for an interview. Now, we at [Government Department] support a charity group that can supply a nice dress or business suit for you ladies applying for a job – up to $1000 dollars worth of clothes for free! So, if you need to have something for an interview, then just apply!”

    Me:” What about men?”

    Lecturer: *pauses* “What about men?”

    Me:“Is there a similar scheme for men?”

    Lecturer: *confused* “I don’t get what you mean?”

    Me: “Well, is there a group supplying suits and ties and such for men to attend interviews in?”

    Lecturer: “Umm… why?”

    Me: “Well, guys might not have suits to go to interviews in either.”

    Lecturer: “Oh, no, mate, that’s your mistake there! A man doesn’t need a suit for an interview! Look, just turn up in your overalls and boots and stuff to an interview. That shows you’re all ready to start the job! Trust me, mate, you’ll ace the next interview if you do that!”

    (Given that I work in the scientific field, namely laboratory bench-work in the food industry, I doubted this but kept my mouth shut.)


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