icon_politics

Surviving On $1.24

| WY, USA | At The Checkout, Awesome Workers, Politics

(This occurs just after the 2016 Presidential election, when disappointment and tensions are high on the losing side.)

Cashier: “Hi there, how’re you doing today?”

Me: “Oh, pretty well, how about you?”

Cashier: “Oh, you know, surviving.”

Me: “Yeah, sometimes that’s all you can do.”

Cashier: “Sometimes it’d be nice to do something besides just survive, you know?”

Me: *after a pause* “I almost made a political comment, but that might not be a good idea.”

Cashier: *quietly* “I think I know the comment you were going to make, and I know how you feel.” *louder* “Okay, your total is $25.24 today.”

Me: “Crap, I only have $24 in bills; I’m going to have to give you some change.”

Cashier: “Here, let me fix that.” *knocks $1.24 off the bill*

(Pause.)

Cashier: “I’m sure there was something in there that should be on sale.”

(I don’t know if it was just because the store was so busy and he didn’t want to wait for me to count coins, or if it was political commiseration, but it made my night!)

icon_transportation

The Key To The Problem Is Not The Key

| UK | Bosses & Owners, Transportation

(I do vehicle maintenance admin for a regional ambulance service. This is both emergency and patient transport. I get a call from a PT team leader based at a small station.)

Team Leader: “Hi, we’re missing the keys for [vehicle number]. Do you know if it was cleaned last night?”

Me: *checks* “No, it looks like the cleaners haven’t been to [Station] yet this week.”

Team Leader: “Oh. I’ll just go check with the crew.” *talks to ambulance crew and returns* “They say that they gave the keys to the cleaners, and the last time they saw it, it was being cleaned in the garage. The cleaners must have taken them and we need them back right now.”

Me: *knowing where this will lead* “Okay, well, the cleaners work night shifts, so they won’t be at work right now. I can ask their supervisor to get in touch with them at home, though.”

(This is deemed a necessity, since we can’t have working ambulances off the road. I call the supervisor and explain. Ten minutes later, the team leader calls back again.)

Team Leader: “We can’t actually find the vehicle either. We’re worried the cleaners might have taken it, since they have the keys. It’s needed urgently on the road and we’re already low on vehicles today. Our response level will be affected because of this.”

(I then relay the information to the supervisor. They call me back an hour later, since the cleaners didn’t pick up at first. I get in touch with Team Leader.)

Me: “Our supervisor has been in touch with the cleaners, but they haven’t been to that station last night–”

Team Leader: “Oh, I was meaning to call you back. We found the vehicle. It was actually outside in the car park and, uh… one of the crew had the keys in his pocket. Sorry about that.”

(That station was tiny! It had FIVE vehicles allocated to it! How could they not notice one outside? And why did they never ask crews to check themselves for keys before automatically assuming that cleaners took them? Those kind of issues happened so often that we raised it with management. But crews are the life-savers, so it didn’t matter how they behave.)

icon_fooddrink

Too Many Cheeseburger-Hold-The-Cheese Stories

| FL, USA | Food & Drink

(I have just unwrapped a sandwich from [Quick-Serve Restaurant], only to find that the toppings are completely wrong. I’d ordered their Barbeque Bacon Cheddar sandwich, which is pretty self-explanatory. The sandwich I received had ketchup, mustard, pickles, and onions, and nothing else. I took it to the food runner to let them know, and the following exchange happened.)

Me: “I ordered this sandwich just now, and it’s really wrong.” *employee takes sandwich*

Employee: “It’s really raw? I’ll have them fix it.” *employee leaves before I can correct her, and returns a minute later*

Employee: “You said it was raw?”

Me: “No, WRONG.”

Employee: “Oh. What was wrong with it?” *I hold up the order ticket, which clearly says BBQ CHED*

Me: “It was supposed to be a barbeque cheddar burger. This one has ketchup, mustard, pickles, and onions.”

Employee: “That’s what comes on it.”

Me: “But it doesn’t have any barbeque sauce, bacon, or cheese…”

Employee: “OH! Was it supposed to be a barbeque cheddar burger?”

Me: “…yes.”

(They did wind up remaking the sandwich for me, but I think I see now why they got it wrong in the first place!)

icon_ignoring

Should Have Taken A Nugget Of Listening

| MT, USA | Employees, Food & Drink, Ignoring & Inattentive

Me: *pulls up to intercom*

Drive-Thru Guy: “Hi, welcome to [Restaurant]. What can I get you today?”

Me: “Hi, can I get three orders of the value nuggets?”

Drive-Thru Guy: “Four piece, five piece, or six piece?”

Me: “Six.”

(The screen in front of me displays three orders of spicy nuggets.)

Drive-Thru Guy: “Is everything correct?”

Me: “They aren’t spicy nuggets, right? I didn’t want spicy nuggets.”

Drive Thru Guy: “Your total is…[total]. Drive up to the second window.”

(The screen doesn’t change.)

Me: “Those aren’t spicy nuggets, right?”

(There’s no answer. I pull up to the second window. The manager is there, not the person who took my order.)

Manager: “Spicy nuggets for [total].”

Me: “I didn’t order spicy nuggets; I told him I didn’t want spicy nuggets.”

Manager: *looks at Drive-Thru Guy, then at me* “I will fix it for you; sorry about that.”

icon_technology

Cleaning At An Alarming Rate

| AL, USA | Non-Dialogue, Technology

I’m the idiot in this story.

I recently started working at this restaurant, and as such, I haven’t figured everything out yet. On this particularly slow Saturday night, I’ve been restocking the various items under the front counter, like the sauces, cups, and lids, as well as cleaning around all these things, too. I see a button that looks like it would release something (I can’t remember what now) so I could clean under it. I press it, and nothing happens. I ignore the button and continue cleaning.

Less than five minutes later, my manager’s on the phone with the franchise owner, and we’ve got two police officers standing in the lobby. Apparently, I’d pressed the silent alarm button. I get a short talking-to, but everyone laughs it off and the officers are just glad there was no danger. The manager gives them a couple of sandwiches for their trouble, and everything goes back to normal.

I felt incredibly bad and apologized profusely, only to be told, “It’s happened before, and it’ll happen again. People just like pushing buttons, even if they don’t know what they’re for.”

Guilty as charged.